Veteran & Vintage Chevrolet  Automobile Association of Australia  South Australian Branch
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"The Communicator"
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             HOT WEATHER POLICY

Club events held outdoors during the hotter months will be subject to cancellation without notice if the forecast temperature for the day of the event is above 37C.  The forecast temperature for the event day will be taken from the previous evening ABC radio or TV forecast.

 
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Something for the Ladies

              VVCAA Southern Run

                                   Sunday 5th May 2019


                     It was a surprisingly sunny Sunday morning when we met up with other club members at Market Square in Old Noarlunga. The Market Square was looking quite lovely and a small local market was being set up on the beautiful green lawns when we arrived. Some people even managed to fit in a quick browse with some purchases made before we headed off on our run, leaving behind Alec and Mary Stevens who had met with us there but were not joining us on the run.

                 Bob (Verrall) had organised the run so that we took a scenic route, many of us travelling on roads we hadnt been on before, enabling us to see more of the beautiful countryside. Those more eagle-eyed among us even managed to spot an elephant, and was that a rhinoceros with it or a hippopotamus?! Luckily there was enough of us who spotted them to convince the doubters! Along the way John Martin, who had been waiting roadside in his Impala Wagon, joined us, and soon we arrived at Meadows where we stopped for morning tea.

                While many enjoyed coffee and/or treats from one of the local Bakeries, some people also took a short walk up and down the street where there are many old historical buildings. It was clear we werent the only people out enjoying the day as there were many motorcycles on the road and also parked at Meadows. One motorcycle in front of the Bakery was a 1942 Harley Davidson which was not only in original condition, but good working order.
After enjoying the break at Meadows we returned to our cars and travelled a little further to arrive at our picnic destination at Mount Barker, the Laratinga Wetlands. This turned out to be quite a large area with various paths around the lakes and grassed picnic areas with covered picnic tables and BBQs. We soon set ourselves up in and around one of these picnic shelters and as predicted on our run sheet, here we had lunch, a bit of a chit chat (actually, a lot), did some walking and saw numerous birds including parrots and fairy wrens as well as ducks and water fowl (to name a few).

            It was an enjoyable day and many thanks go to everyone involved in organising the event, especially Bob Verrall (ably assisted, no doubt, by Sue!). Bob, like Owen on the Burra trip, also wished to take credit for arranging the beautiful weather we enjoyed on the day. Keep up the good work Bob!


Sandy Shepherd
          Dairy Free Rich Chocolate Cake.


23/4 cups plain flour
1 cup cocoa powder
Y2 tsp salt
11/2 cups Nuttelex or similar
21/2 cups sugar
4 large eggs
11/2 cups almond, soy or rice milk
1/4 cup maple syrup
2 tblsp vanilla.

Lightly oil 2x 20cm round cake pans, line the bases with baking paper, oil again and sprinkle bases and sides with a thin dusting of cocoa powder.
Set aside.
In a medium sized mixing bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, cocoa and salt.
Set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, using an electric hand mixer at a high speed setting, cream the shortening and sugar until fluffy, about 4 minutes.
Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add the milk, maple syrup and vanilla, beating until combined.
Using a wooden spoon, stir the dry ingredients into the wet in several additions, until just combined.

Pour half of the batter in each of the prepared pans and bake in a moderate oven for 30- 40 minutes, or until a testing skewer poked in the middle comes out clean.
Allow the cakes to cool completely on a wire cooling rack before frosting.

Chocolate Frosting.

2 cups icing sugar
60g margarine
1/4 cup almond or soy milk
3/4 cup cocoa powder
Y2 tsp vanilla.

In a medium mixing bowl, using an electric hand mixer, cream the sugar and margarine until mixture is thick and well combined, about 1 minute. Add the milk, cocoa powder and vanilla and continue to mix until smooth. Spread onto cake just before serving.
There should be enough mixture in this recipe to join the cakes, as well as spread over the top and sides.

Regarding the milks and shortenings, use whatever you have, it seems to make no difference.
If you don't need it dairy free, butter and cows' milk would probably work just as well.

I hope you enjoy it as much as we did.
Until next time,
Cheers,

Ruth
       Musings from the Registrar
As the first of July approaches, members on conditional registration need to have their log books signed for the coming year by the Registrar. Those members also need to ensure that they are financial members of our club by paying their subscription for the year 2019/2020.

We have an outstanding chance to get all these requirements done in July. We will be having an historic day at the club rooms with a barbeque provided by club. Both myself and our assistant registrar Wolf will be there to sign your books or issue you a new one if you have used your current book for three years. Bring your conditional vehicle that day and see if we can fill the car park with all our beautiful old vehicles. Ensure that your subs are paid and bring your old vehicle on that day to get your logbook signed.

Those members who cannot attend on that day need to make alternative arrangements with me to have your book signed for the period July 2019 to June 2020. If your subscriptions for the coming year have not been paid by the 1st of July, then do not drive your vehicle as it will be unregistered and uninsured. If you have paid your subscriptions but your logbook has not been signed by the 26th August, then do not drive your vehicle.

Happy motoring and keep safe in those beautiful vehicles on our road.

So please remember.

If you have a conditionally registered vehicle with our club:
Pay your subscriptions by the 1st of July
Get your log book signed by the 1st of July or at least by the 26th August.
Do not drive your vehicle on the road after the 1st of July if you are not a
financial member for 2019/2020
More reminders next month. Any questions regarding any matter concerning Conditional Registration please feel free to contact me on 7222 5858 or 0416156213.

Bob Daly
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Some months ago I was talking to Bob Pridham about the story of a paddle steamer stranded in a paddock out back of Burke NSW. Bob came back to me recently with the following article. Thanks Bob!!
This prompted a hunt for photos to show the variations in river flow from season to season. The Darling has always suffered from no flows to flood.

Ed.


             WHERE'S THE RIVER?

The yarn you often hear out west is the one about the paddle steamer sitting miles from any river in the middle of the plain. The story usually goes that the greedy captain tried to get up a flooded creek to load wool from a station and was trapped when the water level suddenly fell.

Guess what?

It's true ..... More or less.

The 15 ton paddle steamer Wave was built at Echuca in 1886 and operated on the Darling River as a general carrier between Burke and Brewarrina. She was then used to carry wool and supplies to the Bourke pumping station. In 1921, there were very high water levels in the river and the Wave was using a short cut across flooded paddocks north of the town rather than traversing the many bends and meanders of the Darling River. One day she snagged and failed to make it back into the main river channel as the water level fell.

Her owner, Lloyd Surrey of Burke, decided to make the best of the situation and continued living in the stranded vessel until his death in 1926, aged seventy seven years. Due to the large number of children and various animals that were always around the boat, the locals called it Noahs Ark!